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How Long Does GERD Last (And Why)?

Exact Answer: Two to Three Weeks

GERD is a commonly used abbreviation for gastroesophageal reflux disease. This is a medical condition in which the contents in the stomach or gastro like the acids and the food people eat are thrown out or refluxed through the esophagus path. This is the reason why the disorder is referred to as gastroesophageal reflux disease.

The most common symptoms of this disease include the feeling of frequent heartburns and a bitter taste experienced in the throat due to the reflux of acids. Wheezing, bad breath and hoarseness are some other signs that a person has contracted GERD. However, some people also experience as if something is caught up in their throat and continuous dry cough.

How Long Does GERD Last?

The Type of GERD and Treatment givenTime Lasts for
Initial Treatment in cases of:
A. Mild to moderate GERD2 to 3 days
B. Moderate to Severe GERDA fortnight
Maintenance Treatment in cases of:
A. Persistent and mild GERD3 to 6 weeks
B. Persistent Moderate to severe GERD6 to 12 weeks

GERD can be treated as per the symptoms a person experiences. Based on that, doctors can opt for initial treatment or a moderate treatment. Yet, it may be noted that there is no proven cure for GERD. Since it is a chronic disease, it can only be regulated or controlled. This, GERD cannot be completely cured but its most visible symptoms can be treated.

A person would need only initial treatment if GERD is less frequent. Initial treatment involves a change in lifestyle and the use of certain antacids. Initial treatment would help to eliminate the mild to moderate GERD symptoms within a few days and moderate to severe GERD symptoms within a fortnight.

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A patient would need maintenance treatment in case GERD is more frequent. Its treatment includes more powerful medications and diverse changes in diet and lifestyle. Maintenance treatment would help eliminate persistent and mild symptoms of GERD in two to three weeks and those of persistent moderate to severe GERD in six to twelve weeks.

Why Does GERD Last So Long?

The timespan in which GERD lasts depends on a plethora of factors. Nonetheless, the most important issue impacting this disorder is the lifestyle of a person. The lifestyle of a person includes issues like his eating habits, physical activity performed, and medical history.

The eating habits of a person are the most important determinant as to how long the GERD will last. The more oily, fried, or junk food is consumed, the more will be the lasting effects of the disease. However, if home-cooked and doctor-advised food is taken, the chances for a faster recovery increase multifold.

The physical activities being undertaken by a person also influence the lasting effect of GERD on the patient. When the person is athletic or does a minimum amount of physical activity daily, there are greater chances of better digestion and fast recovery from the disorder. On the contrary, physical inactivity makes a person susceptible to many diseases for long periods.

There may also be patients with a past medical history regarding GERD or any other disease capable of influencing it. In such cases, the symptoms of GERD in the patient may become more intense.

In addition to these, GERD can also be influenced by certain addictions of the person like cigarettes and alcohol. These habits may increase the lasting time for the disease and the patient may have to suffer for longer.

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Conclusion

GERD is a chronic disease. The symptoms of GERD can be treated but not completely cured. The initial treatment can help to treat GERD’s mild symptoms within days and moderate symptoms within a fortnight. The maintenance treatment can treat persistent GERD in three to five weeks.

The main factor that impacts the lasting time of the disease is the lifestyle of a patient. The food items that the patient consumes and the exercises that are undertaken also determine how early the patient can recover.

References

  1. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00535-004-1417-7
  2. https://gut.bmj.com/content/67/7/1351