How Long Does Greek Yogurt Last (And Why)?

Exact Answer: One to Two Weeks

Greek yogurt is a specially treated form of yogurt obtained after the removal of the liquid containing lactose. This liquid is referred to as Whey and the yogurt undergoes a straining process to remove this whey from the yogurt. Whey is rich in lactose which is a form of natural sugar.

As a consequence of the removal of Whey from the yogurt, the resultant greek yogurt has very low quantities of sugar as compared to the regular yogurt. Strained Greek yogurt offers multiple health benefits. Additionally, such yogurt is also creamier and thicker than regular ones.

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How Long Does Greek Yogurt Last?

Storage PlaceTime Lasts For
On the CounterTwo to Four Days
On the FreezerOne to Two Months
On the RefrigeratorOne to Two Weeks
In a DishOne to Two Days

The strained yogurt can only be stored in the open for a couple of days. When any food item is kept in open for a long time, it comes in contact with a variety of environmental factors, predominantly by the heat. This leads to the early spoilage of Greek yogurt.

When the yogurt is stored in the fridge, it tends to last longer than in an open environment. Greek yogurt is expected to last nearly for a fortnight or one to two weeks in the cool man-made conditions of the fridge. The cool temperatures of the fridge slow down the effects of spoilage leading the yogurt to last longer.

The temperatures in the freezer are very low. When the Greek yogurt is stored in the extremely cool conditions of the freezer, it tends to for the longest period. The sub-zero temperatures of the freezer promote the status quo or prevent any changes to the form of yogurt which helps it to last longer. The yogurt lasts approximately a month in such conditions.

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However, there may be conditions where Greek yogurt is used in the preparation of a dish. In such cases, the dish is safe to be consumed only till none of the ingredients of the dish expires.

Why Does Greek Yogurt Last So Long?

Greek Yogurt can be stored for a period as any raw food item. It can be safely stored in the freezer, the refrigerator or simply, in the open on the table. However, the period for which it can be stored while keeping it safe depends on the prevailing conditions such as moisture and heat.

The storage of Greek yogurt is mostly influenced by the temperature and other weather conditions in the surroundings. The more the temperature of the storage facility, the faster will the yogurt turn unsafe to eat. Conversely, the yogurt will last longer if the temperature is less. Moreover, if the temperatures are sub-zero, they may even start to freeze and thus, last for months.

High temperatures promote the growth of microorganisms in food items, which makes their shelf life shorter. The growth of micro-organisms leads to the development of a foul odor and a sour taste in the yogurt. This further calls for removal from the shelf as it becomes unsafe for human consumption and may even result in food poisoning if consumed.

In addition to that, the growth of microorganisms also leads to the growth of molds in Greek yogurt. Moreover, since yogurt is a soft food item, it becomes very easy for molds to penetrate its surface and reach the interior layers of yogurt. Thus, consuming such a food item is a severe compromise on the health of the person.

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Conclusion

Greek yogurt is the strained version of regular yogurt in which the whey liquid is removed. This Whey is the source of natural sugar, Lactose, and its removal makes the yogurt more healthy.

Greek yogurt usually lasts for a couple of days in the open, a fortnight in the fridge, and a month in the freezer. However, when this yogurt is prepared in a dish, its edible period will also depend on the expiry timeline of the other ingredients of the dish.

References

  1. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0924224416300280
  2. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0023643819300891