How Long Can a Person Use Flonase (And Why)?

Exact Answer: Up To 6 months Of Daily Use

Flonase nasal spray is a common prescription drug used to treat ‘allergic rhinitis’ which commonly include symptoms of sneezing, runny nose, itchy and watery eyes, and other associated symptoms. Its generic name is fluticasone propionate, and it remains speculation among chemists if it is safe for children younger than 4 years of age.

Allergic rhinitis is a common disease with a high rate of morbidity and an attached significant social and economic burden. As first-line treatment for patients with moderate to serious infections, intranasal corticosteroids are suggested, particularly if the nasal clog is a significant symptom. Even if existing intranasal corticosteroids are highly efficient, it is always desired to introduce better formulations with a more effective/safe profile. Fluticasone furoate or Flonase nasal-spray is a new topical, reinforced affinity corticosteroid, and a unique lateral delivery device.

Flonase might be used as a lone medication, or in composition with different medications. It is related to a class of prescriptions or drugs called intranasal, immune suppressant, and corticosteroids. It is a relatively new, intranasal, topical, trifluorinated glucocorticoid with a strong anti-inflammatory function, and low systemic exposure.

How Long Can a Person Use Flonase?

Flonase Nasal Spray should be used by patients at regular intervals as its efficacy depends on regular use. To implement maximum effect, it could take several days and individual patients might experience a varying degree of symptom relief and time to start.

Age groupDosage
Youths And Children (4 Years and Older)Up to 2 months of use in a year
AdultsUp to 6 months of everyday  use

Adolescents and Children (Aged 4 Years and Older)

In teenagers and adolescents, aged 4 and older, the suggested beginning portion is 1 spray for each nostril, when used daily (absolute daily portion ought not to exceed 100 Micrograms). Patients who do not respond adequately to a spray in each nostril should use 2 sprays once, daily for each nose (total daily dose remaining within 200 Micrograms).  The dosage should be lowered to 1 spray per nostril, once adequate control is achieved. The dosage should not exceed up to 2 months of use a year.

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Adults

The recommended beginning dosage for adults is two sprays in each nostril once daily (50 Micrograms fluticasone propionate) (total dose daily should remain within 200 Micrograms). Equally effective is the same total daily dose, one nasal spray given twice daily. Patients can reduce their intakes to one spray once daily, solely for maintenance therapy after the initial few days. The dosage should not exceed 6 months of daily use.

For both children and adults, the maximum total daily dosage should not exceed 2 nasal sprays (200 Micrograms per day). There is no proof of increased efficacy when taken in more than suggested portions.

Why Should a Patient Not Use Flonase For Longer terms?

Intranasal steroid sprays are secure for long-term use and are shown to cause significant systemic side effects with little evidence. However, it is prudent to just utilize them intermittently and at the least portion, to control their symptoms, for patients with chronic rhinitis who can utilize them for long stretches.

The nasal cavity should be screened at least once a year for patients who regularly use a steroid spray, for the risk of septum damage conspicuously remains. New generation formulations must be prescribed, low doses used and their growth monitored regularly, to children using intranasal steroid sprays.

Flonase is widely used in patients with allergic rhinitis for long periods by otolaryngologists.  Extended use of these medicines may lead to certain adverse eye effects.  Post capsule cataract and high intraocular pressure (IOP) levels with intraocular steroids have been reported in the literature over time.

After the utilization of Flonase nasal sprays for longer terms, over-sensitivity reactions like hypersensitivity, contact dermatitis, and rash have been accounted for among patients. If such reactions occur, the use of Flonase nasal spray must be stopped. After Flonase nasal spray administration, rarely though, immediate hypersensitivity reactions may also occur.

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Severe symptoms as eye disorders including symptoms of dryness, irritation, conjunctivitis, blurred vision, and cataracts have been reported among patients who were on nasal spray medications for longer periods of time. Long-term use of any nasal spray, let alone Flonase, is known to damage the tissue, causing infection and pain. Symptoms in certain cases have also been the dependency on nasal spray medication, rendering nasal sprays ineffective in the long run, and a feeling of congestion would persist even after using a decongestant spray.

Hence, it is advisable to not use Flonase for a term longer than prescribed, as it may lead to several negative side effects on the patient.

References

  1. https://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/ccjm/december2005/pien.htm
  2. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2019/020121s045lbl.pdf
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