How Long After An Interview Should You Follow Up (And Why)?

Exact Answer: 5 Business Days To 7 Business Days

When you appear for an interview, it is quite human nature to feel eager to know what would be the conclusion of that interview, whether you will be selected for the designated role you interviewed for or you will have to continue your job hunt. In most cases, the person would feel anxious and as the clock keeps on ticking, the curiosity to know about the interview and job will increase as well.

To be in the sight of the hiring manager or the recruiter of the role you interviewed for, it is always a good idea and even recommended as well to send a follow-up message. However, it must be considered that what is the good time to send a follow-up message to the recruiter.

How Long After An Interview Should You Follow Up

How Long After An Interview Should You Follow Up?

Type Of InterviewTime
Walk-in-interview5 business days to 7 business days
Over-the-call interview1 business day to 3 business days

There are majorly two types of interviews that are conducted in the corporate industries in most of the cases. The two types of interviews are walk-inn interview and over-the-call interview. Depending upon the type of interview, the time it takes for how long after an interview should follow up after an interview varies.

For case line walk-in interviews, it is good to send the follow-up message to the hiring manager or the recruiter within about a minimum of 5 business days to a maximum of 7 business days after appearing for the walk-in interview.

For cases like an over-the-call interview, the person can send the follow-up messages to the hiring manager or the recruiter within a minimum of 1 business day to a maximum of 3 business days.

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Why Does It Take That Long For You To Follow Up After An Interview?

In many cases, there is not much clarity about what is the right time for a person to send a follow-up message to the hiring manager or the recruiter after appearing for an interview.

Though in most of the cases, the average follows up time after an interview for a person is about a minimum of 5 business days to a maximum of 7 business days, there is a major factor that must be considered while deciding the time for how long after an interview should you follow up for an interview. The time determining factor is the type of interview that the person has appeared for.

The walk-in interview is the traditional type of interview in which the candidate is supposed to reach the interview place on a designated date and at the designated type as decided by the hiring manager or the recruiter. The candidate and the recruiter talk in person to each other and the interview of the candidate is taken.

The other type of interview, which is over a call interview, is the type of interview where the candidate is not supposed to go anywhere and is not supposed to meet the hiring manager or the recruiter in person as well. The interview is generally taken over a voice call or a video call. 

Conclusion

Sending a follow-up message after appearing for an interview might seem like a normal step, however, it plays a vital role. A follow-up message can help you leave an impression in the mind of the hiring manager or the recruiter which would significantly increase the chances of you getting selected for the designated role you interviewed for. However, sending the follow-up message at the wrong time can also reduce your chances of getting selected. 

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Thus, it is highly important to know what is the right time you should send a follow-up message after you appear for an interview so that it is either not too early or not too late as well. For most cases, the right time to send a follow-up message after an interview is within 5 to 7 business days. 

References

  1. https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=jaWHcDTMkL8C&oi=fnd&pg=PP7&dq=interview&ots=qCPg9xSRUa&sig=2UQ10Bc_MlZEz6ZI8ggvUhj92Vg
  2. http://www.qualitative-research.net/index.php/fqs/article/view/848